Marble Polishing:
Repair Dull Etched Marble

Marble polishing and etching are commonly misunderstood. Those dull "water spots" and "glass-rings" (etch marks) are baffling. And often people hold false assumptions and have incorrect ideas about how to polish marble or how marble polishing is actually performed to create a shiny surface finish.

Many think that the shine or polish on marble comes from applying a potion, lotion or chemical during marble cleaning.

Also, some believe that all marble is supposed to be shiny and that the dull etch marks are some type of "stain".

Well, none of the above is true, but some of it is not entirely false either, which requires some explanation... here we go!

Marble polishing explained shiny white carrara marble kitchen countertop

It's not surprising there's confusion surrounding the topic of marble polishing since the term "polish" has a number of subtly different meanings in the stone industry.

Most often what is meant by "polish", "polished" or "polishing" is in reference to the type of "finish" on marble, travertine, limestone, granite or any natural stone.

Natural stone can be finished with a number of different surface types, styles or looks depending on what is wanted by the buyer.

A "polished" finish is the shiny, high-gloss type of finish with the deepest color saturation commonly seen on marble and granite countertops.

Because a polished/shiny finish is so common, many people believe that all marble is supposed to be polished or shiny.

However, as noted above, marble (or nearly any stone) can have a number of different finish types.

A "honed" finish is satin-smooth, but is not reflective or shiny and the colors are more muted. It's often referred to as a "matte" finish.

Other surface finishes include: tumbled, flamed, antiqued, brushed, hammered and more. Each of these has a different look, however all of them are non-reflective. Only a "polished" finish has the high-gloss, shiny surface.

It is very common for marble floors to have a honed finish since it's easier to maintain. And even though colors are more muted with a hone finish, many stone colors and patterns are more appealing with a honed finish.

A shiny polished finish will wear down with foot traffic creating dull trails around the floor. Also, dust and dirt are seen much more easily on a polished floor.

Sometimes people buy a house with a honed floor and mistakenly think that something is wrong with it because it seems dull compared to the shiny marble seen in hotels, etc. They reason that it should be shiny, or it just needs "polishing" with a marble "polish". Let's clarify.... 

Marble Polishing Process

It's a common myth that the shine on marble counter tops and floor tile is achieved by applying some type of chemical or "polish" to the surface. Not exactly. The "shine" on marble is not something that sits on top of the marble... it is part of the marble itself.

While there is one situation (etching - see below) where a chemical compound can be used to polish marble, it utilizes as physical process (like sanding wood) to bring back the shine. The chemical itself does not supply the shine.

Also, this specialized product is engineered to work on marble (travertine or limestone too) that was originally polished to a shine. So, it restores a damaged shiny finish, but is insufficient to create that shine from raw marble to begin with.

The shiny polish seen on marble slabs, tile and other stones is achieved by high friction on huge stone polishing machines at the factory long before it gets to a show room or customer.

A certain finish can be changed or re-finished after installation, but this requires the skill of an experienced marble repair professional using special tools, abrasives and a multi-step process... not just a wipe down with a chemical or "polish".

Thus, creating a particular finish on marble (or any stone) or polishing marble to make it "shiny" is not a DIY job.

However, let me explain the subtle distinction that arises with the issue of etching.

Mystery of Marble Etching 

Marble (travertine, limestone and any "calcitic" stone too) is sensitive and reactive with certain types of foods, products and chemicals, which can damage the surface finish leaving dull and/or lighter-colored whitish spot often described as a "water spot", "water stain", "glass-ring", or "ghost stain".

Marble etching explained - glass ring on shiny marble countertop

So, if you spill acidic orange juice (or any of the many other acidic foods and drinks) on marble it will corrode the surface. This corrosive chemical reaction will essentially eliminate the shiny surface layer achieved from the marble polishing process described above revealing the dull marble underneath.

Likewise, if you use the wrong products for cleaning marble (too acidic or too alkaline) you can destroy the shiny finish over the entire surface making your whole marble countertop or floor "dull".

Etching begins on contact and the longer the exposure the more severe the etching.

And sealing does not prevent etching. You must prevent contact with the reactive substances.

An etch mark is not a stain. Nothing has absorbed into the marble. Also, plain water (unless acidic like some well and city water supplies) does not cause it. Etching and staining are two completely different processes.

You may hear or read that "marble stains easy". Actually marble does not stain easily... it "etches" easily and most (including many in the stone industry) don't know the difference.

Here's the twist about how a shiny finish is created and how marble polishing is done...

As noted above, the original finish (no matter what type) is done "at the factory" with machines. Applying some potion or chemical does not do it.

However... a previously polished marble countertop or tile that has dull spots from etching can be repaired rather easily using a nifty DIY marble polish made specifically for this purpose. 

Repairing Etch Marks

The Etch Remover Marble Polishing product is very effective for restoring small areas of mild to moderate surface damage. It will not take raw marble and make it shiny or "polish" it, nor is it really suitable to re-finish a honed marble so it is polished and shiny.

It will make a honed marble shiny or more shiny, but it is not made to be used by a homeowner to re-finish a large area like a floor or entire countertop.

It's easy to see why this issue creates such confusion and misunderstanding. The long and short is that whatever finish you want on your marble (shiny, flat, rough, rustic) it is originally done at the factory, by a skilled professional prior to install or as a marble repair.

Again, a finish can be changed once installed, but that is a demanding job that requires special abrasives, tools and the skill of an experienced stone restoration professional. It's not a DIY job... not even for the handiest of handymen.

Also, any finish type you find on marble (say in an existing home you purchase) is likely the original finish.

If it is "dull" or honed, then likely that's the way it is supposed to be and it doesn't "need polishing".

Although, it could have been etched by using the wrong marble cleaning products, but that's the only time it ever "needs" marble polishing.

Of course, if you'd rather have a shiny polished finish, then you can have a honed surface polished into a shine by a professional, but there is nothing "wrong" with the honed floor.

The Etch Remover Polishing product restores dull spots on polished marble, as noted above.  

Honed marble etch marks require a different procedure. No product exists to use on a honed surface.

Either professional restoration is needed, or follow the DIY instructions in the Removing Etch Marks e-book where you'll find a complete discussion of marble polishing and etch removal along with step-by-step instructions for all possible situations.

The same information in the above e-book along with everything else you should know about cleaning marble, protection, maintenance and the most effective solutions for all types of problems and marble cleaning issues is in the Cleaning Marble Secrets e-book.

Marble Polishing Questions & Answers

Learn even more! Click on the links below to read detailed answers to common (and unusual) marble cleaning questions.

Polished Marble Vanity Etched or Stained? 
QUESTION: I recently purchased two beautiful cabinets with black marble vanity tops. The master bath is beautiful but the hallway's looks dirty. …

Polishing Marble Floor Tile Dull Spots 
QUESTION: I have a question about polishing marble. I have marble floor tile in the kitchen. Now it lost the shine. The marble color is grey with …

Make Honed Marble Shiny 
QUESTION: I have just had my honed white Carrara marble kitchen countertop sealed. Is there any product I can use to give a little shine ....olive …

Re-Crystallization vs. Standard Marble Polishing 
QUESTION: Are you familiar with the process of marbleizing / crystallizing for marble polishing? They've used it in Florida and Italy for over 20 …

Cleaning Dulled Finish of Bathroom Marble Countertop 
QUESTION: The master bath marble countertop surface has been dulled, most likely from liquid drifting down from hairspray, deodorant spray, etc. …

Marble Countertop Dull and Dirty 
QUESTION: We had marble countertops installed in our bathroom and kitchen along with a backsplash. From day one, it all looks dull and dirty. …

Polished Marble Shower Tiles Now Dull Not rated yet
QUESTION: We had 10" square marble shower tiles installed on the walls of our master shower 5 years ago. The color is a deep rust with white veins. …

Black Marble Polishing Not rated yet
QUESTION: Once you have removed scratches and etching, what do you use to give the marble that high gloss, glass look? ANSWER: Marble polishing …

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QUESTION: I have a seven-foot marble dining table the finish has long cracks. I have lifted a piece of the finish off the table. It looks like plastic …

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Repair Marble Vanity Top Dullness Not rated yet
QUESTION: How do you restore the luster to a dull countertop? ANSWER: Dull spots, water-spots, glass-rings, etc. on marble countertops are usually …

Polishing Marble Coffee Table Not rated yet
QUESTION: I would like to know the method and products used for marble polishing and cleaning a marble coffee table that is charcoal in color. ANSWER: …

Polishing Hazy Marble Backsplash Not rated yet
QUESTION: We just had a marble backsplash installed and it is hazy not shiny. How do I get rid of the haze? ANSWER: It could be one of two things. …

How To Polish Marble Not rated yet
QUESTION: How do you polish worn white marble? ANSWER: In general marble polishing to restore the finish on a worn surface is done solely by a marble …

Marble Bar Top Acidic Spots Not rated yet
QUESTION: New marble bar top used for party. No coasters, when I wipe with damp soft cloth I feel stains and see a dullness on the spots. How do …

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